Two sides of the moon

Saturday. I carried ninety-nine red roses down Bay Street.

Sunday. I rested.

Monday. I made music for none but this one.

Tuesday. I made moon cakes to remember my froms.

Wednesday. I painted with inks distilled from ninth month fields.

Thursday. I shared a meal with a dearest friend, laughed, drank, and laughed some more.

Friday. I wrote.

Saturday. I shall see.

Sunday. I shall rest.

Steamed Mugwort Mooncake with Pork Floss and Salted Yolk Date Paste

Steamed Mugwort Mooncake with Pork Floss and Salted Yolk Date Paste

  • 300g pitted dates
  • 120g salted duck egg yolks (raw, about 10)
  • 120g pork floss (you can find this pretty much in any Asian grocery store)
  • 15g fried shallot crisps (you can find this pretty much in any Asian grocery store)
  • 60g peanut butter (smooth or crunchy is up to you)
  1. Bake the egg yolks on a parchment lined baking sheet at 350 degrees F for about 15 minutes or until fragrant and cooked through.
  2. For the pork floss filling, place all the ingredients except for the peanut butter (be sure to add any of the oil that’s rendered out from the egg yolks) in a food processor and pulse until coarsely but evenly chopped.
  3. Add the peanut butter and pulse until the mixture gathers into one single clump.
  4. Shape the filling into 16 balls that are approximately 37.5g each. (You can use a scale to be precise, or approximate using 2 tbsp per ball.)
  5. Cover and chill until needed.
  • 200g fresh spinach
  • 150g filtered water
  • 150g sticky rice flour
  • 100g rice flour
  • 30g sugar
  • 1 tbsp mugwort powder
  1. Place the spinach and water in a blender and blend until as smooth as possible.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together the remaining ingredients and gradually knead in the spinach mixture until a dough forms. It should not feel tacky but still be soft and pliable. Do not add too much liquid – stop as soon as you get a dough you can work with.
  3. Divide the dough into 16 balls that are approximately 37.5g each.
  4. Cover the rest of the dough balls with a damp tea towel as you work.
  5. Wearing disposable gloves, take a piece of dough and flatten it between your palms to a disc approximately 10cm in diameter, with the thickness being greatest near the center and thinning out towards the edges.
  6. Take a ball of filling and place it in the center of the flattened dough. Flip it over so the dough naturally drapes over the filling and using the C-shape of your thumb, hug the dough snugly to the filling until only the bottom is still exposed.
  7. Flip it over again and gather the edges together to seal off the filling. Roll the whole thing between your palms into a sphere and to smooth it out, then roll it in some cooked rice flour*. Roll it between your palms again to dust off the excess and place it on your work surface. Lightly rice flour a 75g moon cake mold and press it onto the unformed moon cake. Release it and place in a parchment lined steamer.
  8. Continue until all of the dough and filling has been used.
  9. Steam for 25 minutes on high heat until completely cooked.
  10. Brush with vegetable oil to prevent them from drying out and enjoy while hot.
  11. Alternatively, let cool and refrigerate (up to 5 days), or freeze (up to 2 months) in airtight containers. Just steam for 20 minutes before serving.
Matcha Snow Skin Mooncake with Roasted Chestnuts and Yuzu Red Bean Paste
  • 500g red bean paste
  • 100g shelled roasted chestnuts (roasted walnuts would be great too), roughly chopped
  • 30g yuzu tea preserves
  1. Mix together all of the ingredients.
  2. Shape into 16 balls that are approximately 37.5g each.
  3. Cover and refrigerate until needed.
  • 75g rice flour
  • 75g sticky rice flour
  • 50g corn starch
  • 85g icing sugar
  • 250g water
  • 45g honey or rice bran syrup
  • 75g full fat coconut milk
  • 15g matcha powder
  1. In a large bowl, mix together all ingredients with a whisk until completely smooth and homogeneous.
  2. Pour the mixture through a sieve into a heat proof bowl that’s been greased with vegetable oil.
  3. Steam the mixture for about 25-30 minutes, or until completely solid in the middle.
  4. Transfer the cooked dough to a stand mixer and using either the paddle or hook attachment, knead for 5-10 minute until cool to the tough and the mixture is smooth. It will still look suspiciously sticky – don’t worry, that’s how it’s supposed to be. As long as it holds its shape you’re on the right track.
  5. Transfer onto a piece of cling film, wrap tightly, and refrigerate until completely chilled.
  6. Remove the chilled dough from the fridge and divide into 16 pieces. Cover with a piece of cling film as you work.
  7. Wearing disposable gloves, take a piece of dough and coat it completely in cooked rice flour. Dust off any excess and flatten it between your palms until it is approximately 10cm in diameter with the thickness being greatest near the center and thinning out towards the edges.
  8. Take a ball of filling and place it in the center of the flattened dough. Flip it over so the dough naturally drapes over the filling and using the C-shape of your thumb, hug the dough snugly to the filling until only the bottom is still exposed.
  9. Flip it over again and gather the edges together to seal off the filling. Roll the whole thing between your palms into a sphere and to smooth it out, then roll it in some cooked rice flour*. Roll it between your palms again to dust off the excess and place it on your work surface. Lightly rice flour a 75g moon cake mold and press it onto the unformed moon cake. Release it and place in a parchment lined plate.
  10. Repeat steps 7-9 with the rest of your filling. Place the formed mooncakes in airtight containers to chill for 2 hours before serving.
  11. Alternatively, freeze the mooncakes in airtight containers for up to 2 months. Just defrost completely in the fridge before consuming.

*Cooked rice flour is just rice flour that’s been…cooked. Traditionally people would toast a couple tablespoons of rice flour in a pan over medium heat for about 10 minutes or until lightly golden. I prefer throw it in a microwave safe bowl and microwave it for 2 minutes. Kills off bacteria and cooks the starch, same idea.

Thoughts? I'd love to hear them!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s